The 2018 Lyrid Meteor Shower Will Light Up the Sky on Earth Day. Here Are the Best Places to See It How to Catch a Glimpse of This Weekend's Lyrid Meteor Shower The Lyrid Meteor Shower Is Coming This Weekend. Here's How to See One of The Best Meteor Showers of the Year How to spot Lyrids, Eta Aquarid meteor showers over Arizona The dazzling Lyrid meteor shower is visible this week — here's how to see the shooting stars

The 2018 Lyrid Meteor Shower Will Light Up the Sky on Earth Day. Here Are the Best Places to See It

The 2018 Lyrid meteor shower peaks on April 22, the same day as Earth Day. Here's your guide on how and where are the best places to view it

The 2018 Lyrid Meteor Shower Will Light Up the Sky on Earth Day. Fortune may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. This year, peak viewing time is before dawn on April 22. Staying fixated on that point will make the meteors appear short—“an effect of perspective called foreshortening,” NASA explains. The waxing moon will set after midnight local time, leaving the sky open for visible meteors.

After about 30 minutes in the dark, your eyes will adapt and you will begin to see meteors. Veteran night sky photographer Brad Goldpaint took this amazing photo of the Milky Way and a Lyrid meteor over Crater Lake, Oregon, during three years of astronomical photo sessions. Lyrids are also known to leave “glowing dust trains” in the sky, but viewers have to be on the look-out to catch them as they only last a few seconds.

How to Catch a Glimpse of This Weekend's Lyrid Meteor Shower

Conditions are expected to be favorable, and experts say the shower might produce as many as 18 meteors every hour

Indigenous Australian communities also have a deep relationship with the meteor showers, The Conversation reports . According to a video from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Lyrid meteor shower is active from Saturday, April 14 through Monday, April 30. Offers may be subject to change without notice. The waning crescent moon will have set by then, so it won’t obscure the meteor shower with its own light.

Find a spot where the sky appears clear, without light pollution or large buildings. That's when the meteor shower is supposed to "peak," with around 10-20 meteors per hour showing, according to EarthSky .  Head outside before dawn on Sunday for the best view. The ony factor is that darn Michigan weather. Astrophotographer Adam Gerdes sent in a photo of Lyrid meteors taken over New Haven, Missouri.

The Lyrid Meteor Shower Is Coming This Weekend. Here's How to See One of The Best Meteor Showers of the Year

The annual Lyrid meteor shower will happen until April 25. Here's how to watch it

Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images See all of the best photos of the week in these slideshows For the best views, avoid the cities and head to an area with low light pollution. The Boorong clan of north-west Victoria—who no longer exist as a separate group—named the bright star Vega after the Boorong “Neilloan” constellation depicting the Mallee fowl . While a few meteors may be spotted late at night on Saturday, light from the waxing moon may interfere with visibility.

Find an area well away from city or street lights,” NASA recommends. “Come prepared with a sleeping bag, blanket or lawn chair. Brigit Katz is a freelance writer is based in Toronto. The sky will be clearest after midnight local time on April 22, which is the best moment to head out and see the meteors. The waxing moon should set before the meteors appear, making for perfect viewing — though meteor showers are notoriously fickle.

How to spot Lyrids, Eta Aquarid meteor showers over Arizona

Corus News. Dark, country skies can yield a clearer sky, so it’s best to avoid areas packed with street lights, bright shop windows and illuminated skyscrapers. Choose a Membership That's Perfect for You! Special equipment — telescopes, binoculars — is not necessary to view the Lyrid meteor shower, which is safe to view with the naked eye. Market data provided by Interactive Data . Lie flat on your back with your feet facing east and look up, taking in as much of the sky as possible.

The dazzling Lyrid meteor shower is visible this week — here's how to see the shooting stars

The Lyrid meteor shower peaks this weekend. While meteor showers are difficult to accurately predict, you'll probably get your best glimpse of it in the early morning hours of April 22 (if you're in the northern hemisphere), when the waxing moon is least likely to interfere. The waxing moon

READ MORE:  What to know about the Orionid meteor shower How to watch Those living in the Northern Hemisphere get the best view of this meteor shower. As the cold nights of winter start to fade, spotting its shooting stars is a perfect way to welcome summer on the northern hemisphere. The meteor shower takes place when Earth passes through the stream dust and debris left behind by Comet Thatcher. And while the Lyrid meteor shower should be viewable no matter your location, there are a few other variables to take into consideration: hemisphere and weather.

The Lyrids are so-called because they appear to burst forth from Vega, the brightest star in the constellation Lyra. It's commonly known that a single asteroid set off the dinosaurs' extinction. A cloud system is expected to spread from parts of the midwest to the south and into parts of the Appalachian mountains, blocking some visibility in those areas. The comet, which takes 415 years to orbit the sun, isn't expected back until 2276, according to EarthSky.  The Lyrid meteor shower is one of the oldest known meteor showers.

Lyrids are a modest meteor shower, but even one is a treat

Canadians who want to witness it should go outside, away from city lights, after the moon sets and before dawn. Brief but hopefully beautiful, the shower lasts from April 16 to about April 25, peaking this year on the morning of April 22. This comet takes about 415 years to orbit the sun, and shouldn’t swing by Earth until 2276. For those in the U.S., AccuWeather has a map showing what areas of the country will have good, fair, or poor conditions for viewing.

But the Lyrids are actually tiny particles and debris that trail behind comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher . With the development of better flight technology, commercial air travel received an unprecedented boom in the 1960s. A meteor from the Lyrid meteor shower streaks through the sky above a barn along a country road near Oakland, Ore. The 2018 Lyrid Meteor Shower is coming to a sky near you this weekend.

The Lyrid meteor shower is coming to a sky near you this weekend

NASA advises spectators go outside bundled up, and lie flat on their backs for several minutes before the start of the shower so their eyes can adjust to the darkness. Although the waxing crescent moon should set before those key morning hours, like any meteor shower, the Lyrids certainly aren’t guaranteed to stun. Its glowing debris, however, has created some incredible light shows in the past. It is the “first significant meteor shower in a few months,” according to AccuWeather’s astronomy blogger Dave Samuhel.

When Earth crosses the comet’s orbital path each year in April, the debris collides with our planet’s atmosphere at a speed of 109,600 mph. Get the best of Smithsonian.com by email. Lyrid meteors will streak in various directions, radiating from the constellation Lyra. The Lyrids are known for their fast and bright meteors, though not as fast or as plentiful as the famous Perseids in August, Lyrids can surprise watchers with as many as 100 meteors seen per hour.

Lyrid Meteor Shower 2018: How and when to see it this weekend

The 2018 Lyrid Meteor Shower is coming to a sky near you this weekend. Here's everything you need to know.

While the meteors will appear to come from a point in the sky that is home to the small constellation Lyra, it’s not important to look in a particular direction of the sky. Recommended Slideshows 51 In Pictures: The 50 Most Powerful Military Forces in the World 51 50 Best-Selling Albums in U.S. Every now and then, far more Lyrid meteors appear than normal in outbursts of 100 shooting stars per hour—and sometimes even more.

The Most Amazing Lyrid Meteor Shower Photos of All Time

See the most spectacular photos of Lyrid meteors, pieces of Comet Thatcher that rain down on Earth every year in April.

The next meteor shower If viewers aren’t able to catch the Lyrid meteor shower, they don’t have to worry too much. History 44 In Pictures: Every U.S. Recent outbursts have been spotted from Greece in 1922, from Japan in 1945 and from the U.S. in 1982, EarthSky reports. Time Inc. Terms & Conditions . NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke tells Emspak of Space.com that this year’s event may see as many as 18 meteors per hour.

Lyrid meteor shower: How Canadians can catch a glimpse of the celestial show

The Lyrid meteor shower takes place between April 16 and 25.

The next one, called  Eta Aquarids meteor shower,  is set to begin on April 19 and will last until May 28. President Ranked From Best to Worst The radiant—the patch of sky that looks like the shower’s source—is near the bright star Vega in the constellation Lyra. The longest observed meteor shower, this stream of debris has been lighting up Earth’s skies for at least 2,600 years, Cooke said. All Rights Reserved.

On rare occasions, the Lyrids will intensify and erupt into “outbursts” of up to a 100 meteors per hour. The Lyrid meteor shower, which started on Monday, will clearest in the hours before dawn on April 22, according to EarthSky , when the set moon won’t interfere with visibility. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy ( Your California Privacy Rights ).

Lyrids: How to Watch One of the Oldest Known Meteor Showers

Humans have been watching the Lyrids for more than 2,600 years.

What is incel? In fact, meteors can appear all over the sky so it’s best to have as wide a field of view as possible. Ancient Chinese narrative history Zuo zhuan , which covers the years 722 to 468 B.C.E., compares a 687 B.C.E. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy ( Your California Privacy Rights ). The Lyrid meteor shower occurs each year in late April, and is best observed in the Northern Hemisphere when the skies are dark—after moonset and before sunrise.

For those looking forward to catching the Lyrid meteor shower at its peak, head out before dawn on Sunday, April 22. TIME may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Lie flat on your back with your feet facing east and look up, taking in as much of the sky as possible. A Lyrid meteor shines bright in this amazing long exposure view from photographer Veerayen Mohanadas of Kulim, Kedah in Malaysia.